July 15, 2021 1 Comment

As many of you may be aware, as part of the IFRA 49th Amendments; the classification of Reed Diffusers has changed from 11 to 10A, so what does this mean? IFRA consider any product in 10A to be a skin contact item and as such, this limits the maximum safe percentage for certain ingredients used in the production of oils thus rendering some oils unsafe for use in diffusers under the 49th Amendments. We've been asked a lot about which oils of ours remain safe for use and which ones can no longer be used in reed diffusers, read on to find out...

When do the IFRA 49th Amendment changes come into effect?

This change impacts all suppliers and all oils on the market with there being two key dates as follows:

Existing Products: 10th May, 2022

New Products: 10th May, 2021

The compliance date for new products entering the market has now passed, this means that any oils launched by a supplier must comply with the IFRA 49th Amendments and any products that you as a maker did not offer prior to the 10th of May, 2021 must comply. 

As you can see, we are yet to reach the compliance date for existing products meaning that you can continue to use the maximum percentage allowed under the IFRA 48th Amendment category 11 (the original classification for reed diffusers) until this date however it is important to keep in mind that you cannot continue to sell products after this date even if they were manufactured prior to the 10th of May, 2022.

Which fragrances are impacted by this change?

From our current range, we have five fragrances which will no longer be safe for use in reed diffusers after the 10th of May, 2022. These are:

  • Molten Amber
  • Snug as a Bug
  • Violet, Lily & Rose
  • Warm Sandalwood
  • Winter's Night

In order to avoid confusion, these fragrances have been updated on our site already to state they are not safe for use in reed diffusers, the IFRA certificate has also been updated to the IFRA 49th Amendment version. 

Are there any other fragrances that cannot be used in reed diffusers because of this change?

We recently launched the reformulated version of a number of our most popular oils, sadly a number of these are not safe for use in diffusers or are restricted to less than 25% as a result of the IFRA 49th Amendments. We've included a list below of our current range of reformulated oils to make it easier for you to work out which ones can and can't be used in diffusers under the new amendments. It is important to note these oils are considered new products and as such the IFRA 49th Amendment regulations are already applicable.

Fragrance Oil Name Diffuser Use
Amalfi Coast Yes - 24%
Australian Bush No
Autumn Days Yes
Bergamot & Patchouli No
Black Amber & Lavender Yes
Black Raspberry & Vanilla Yes
Black Rose & Oud No
Clove, Orange & Cedarleaf No
Coconut Lime Yes - 23%
Creamy Cinnamon No
Cucumber, Ginger & Mint Yes
Egyptian Amber Yes - 12%
Fresh Ginger & Green Tea No
Fresh Hay, Honey & Amber No
Goji Berry & Blood Orange Yes - 23%
Good Morning World No
Japanese Honeysuckle No
Jasmine & Magnolia Yes
Leather & Oudh No
Lemongrass & Persian Lime Yes
Lime, Basil & Mandarin No
Lychee Peony Yes - 16%
Moon Lake Musk Yes
Neroli & Ylang Ylang No
Pumpkin Spiced Latte Yes
Salted Caramel Yes
Sheer Lily & White Rose No
Sleepy Head Yes
Strawberry Fizz Yes
Thyme, Olive & Bergamot Yes
Tigerlily Blossom Yes
Vanilla, Patchouli & Sandalwood No
Very Vanilla Yes
Vetiver, Cedarwood & Fir No
Watermelon Lemonade Yes - 18%
Wild Lemongrass Yes 

 

What about the rest of the fragrances we offer?

We're pleased to advise the rest of our fragrances are safe for use in diffusers under the IFRA 49th Amendments to the maximum percentage shown in the table within the fragrance listing. 

 


1 Response

Diane Dettering
Diane Dettering

July 20, 2021

Thank you so much for taking the time to put this together, it makes my life so much easier to figure out which ones I can use moving forward, and also which ones I may add in the future.

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